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Tag Archives: PIPA

Taiwan Data Protection Regime: CDPA to PIPA

Taiwan’s data protection regime will undergo a sea change when the new Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA) comes into effect. That is supposed to be in January of 2012, but may be delayed depending on public reaction to the draft enforcement rules now under discussion by committees of experts. The Personal Information Protection Act is [...]

Data Controller License Requirement Lifted

Non-government data controllers in the finance, telecommunications, and insurance sectors will no longer have to apply for a license in order to collect personal data, following recent amendments to the 1995 Computer-Processed Personal Data Protection Act (the CDPA) promulgated on May 26, 2010.

Taiwan’s legislature approved extensive revisions to the CDPA last April, but the effective date of the amended law, the Data Protection Act (the DPA), is to be determined by the Executive Yuan, according to the DPA. Although the DPA is not expected to come into force until sometime in 2011, the Executive Yuan has yet to make any sort of official announcement on when the entirety of the new act will come into effect. Until then, non-government data controllers will still need to follow the other rules outlined in the CPDA, with the exception of the licensing requirement.

Legislature Updates Privacy Act

In April 2010, Taiwan’s legislature approved extensive and long-awaited revisions to the 1995 Computer-Processed Personal Data Protection Act (hereafter, the CDPA). The effective date of the amended law, entitled the Personal Data Protection Act (hereafter, the DPA), has yet to be announced by the Executive Yuan. The DPA is not expected to come into force until sometime in 2011, however, so as to allow time for supporting enforcement rules to be drafted and for public and private entities and individuals to familiarize themselves with the new data protection regime. This article examines imminent changes to Taiwan’s data protection framework that are of particular relevance to the private sector.

 

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